TWO children from Madison County, Iowa are among seven victims killed in Saturday night’s tornado.

Search and rescue operations would have shifted to shelter assessments.

Officials estimated that between 20 and 30 homes were destroyed, and additional power cuts are currently being assessed.

Parts of Vinton are suffering from structural damage, downed power lines, gas leaks and more, according to KCRG.

At least seven people are said to have died.

Authorities have released the names and ages of six of the seven victims: Cecilia Lloyd, 72, Rodney Clark, 64, Melissa Bazley, 63, Michael Bolger, 37, Kenley Bolger, 5, and Owen Bolger, 2 years.

Read our Iowa tornado live blog for the latest news and updates…

  • Shocking images before the damage

    A Winterset man captured video of the tornado before it passed over his family’s home, damaging all the buildings on their farm.

  • What is Tornado Valley?

    According to AccuWeather Senior Meteorologist Dan Kottlowski, “Tornado Alley is an area of ​​the United States where there is a high potential for tornado development.”

    “This area encompasses much of northern Texas northward through Oklahoma, Kansas, Missouri, and parts of Louisiana, Iowa, Nebraska, and eastern Colorado,” a- he noted.

    This region is most susceptible to tornadoes due to the contrasting air masses that frequently collide, producing severe thunderstorms that can lead to the development of tornadoes.

  • Watch the tornado

    A Twitter user shared a video of a tornado as it ripped through Iowa on Saturday night.

    The clip shows the towns of Patterson and Winterset.

  • two tornadoes

    The Winterset tornado was one of at least two EF3 tornadoes to hit Iowa on Saturday, according to the NWS.

    NWS damage surveys indicate that another EF3 tornado with estimated winds of 138 mph was responsible for the damage near Chariton.

  • Deadly Storm

    Dramatic footage showed homes torn apart as the killer tornado tore through Madison County, southwest of Des Moines, on Saturday.

    the The storm was classified as an EF3 tornado with winds of 136 to 155 miles per hour, leaving a destruction path of 13.7 miles, according to WHO-TV.

    “This is, I think, the worst anyone has seen in quite a long time,” said Diogenes Ayala, director of emergency management for Madison County.

    Authorities estimated that 25 to 30 homes were destroyed.

  • Family tragedy

    Four members of a family died after the tornado ripped through their home on Saturday.

    Two neighbors also died, authorities said.

  • Volunteer Information

    Volunteers are being ferried to damaged areas in school buses to help clean up the widespread devastation.

    Anyone interested in helping can call the Madison County Chamber of Commerce at (515) 462-1185.

  • Family tragedy

    Tornado victims so far include Melissa Bazley, 63, Michael Bolger, 37, Kenley Bolger, 5, and Owen Bolger, 2.

    The Madison County Sheriff said Melissa Bazley, 63, is the grandmother of the Bolger children, who were from Missouri.

    Eight people were in the family home when the tornado touched down, according to deputies.

    The children’s mother, grandfather and two other children survived by hiding in a pantry.

  • What category of tornado hit Iowa?

    At 4:30 p.m. on March 5, Madison County, southwest of Des Moines, was hit by an EF-3 tornado.

    This tornado had a speed of approximately 136 miles per hour.

    Seven people died, including two children.

    States from Texas to Florida are said to be expecting tornadoes in March, with Iowa normally hit by at least two.

    Madison County Emergency Management Director Diogenes Ayalas said, “This is, I think, the worst anyone has seen in quite a long time. It’s a generalized storm.

  • The different categories of tornadoes, continued

    Another measurement system, known as the Enhanced Fujita Scale (or EF Scale), is a set of damage-based wind ratings.

    The scale uses three-second gusts of wind from the estimated point of damage to determine a category of natural disaster.

    The measurements of the EF scale are as follows:

    • 0: 65-85mph
    • 1: 86-110mph
    • 2: 111-135mph
    • 3: 136-165mph
    • 4: 166-200mph
    • 5: Over 200mph
  • What are the different categories of tornadoes?

    According to the Fujita scale, tornadoes in North America are classified into one of six categories: F0 to F5.

    The Fujita Scale (or F-Scale) measures the intensity of damage caused by tornadoes, according to the National Weather Service.

    On the Fujita scale, category four and five tornadoes are considered violent. Two and three are strong, while one and zero are considered weak.

  • “Give them some space”

    Search and rescue operations have ceased and officials have moved on to assessing shelters, officials said.

    “Let the people living there, let them clean up, give them space. It’s pretty devastating to our community,” said Madison County Emergency Management Director Diogenes Ayala.

    “Give people time to heal. Keep our community in your prayers tonight.

  • Winterset Community School District Statement

    The Winterset Community School District released a statement on its Facebook page.

    “Our hearts go out to everyone affected by today’s inclement weather. We want to let everyone know that New Bridge Church is opening its doors tonight as a Red Cross shelter and will be offering a pancake breakfast from 7am for those affected and emergency medical service workers.

  • What is a tornado?

    Tornadoes are narrow funnels of wind that form from a thunderstorm and touch down on the ground.

    They are known to be incredibly violent spinning columns of air and can be particularly dangerous due to the lack of wind visibility.

  • Social media reports

    A traveler shared a photo of a Des Moines airport basement.

    “Our plane landed, then they stopped all air traffic. It shouldn’t last long.” tweeted Karl Vater.

  • What is tornado season?

    Tornado season refers to the time of year when the United States sees the most tornadoes.

    According to the National Severe Storms Laboratory, tornado season hits around early spring near the Gulf Coast.

    For the southern plains – Texas, Oklahoma and Kansas – tornado season peaks around May and June.

    In the Northern Plains and upper Midwest – including North and South Dakota, Nebraska, Iowa, Minnesota and surrounding areas – tornado season falls around June and July.

    However, tornadoes can occur at any time of the year.

  • Watch the tornado

    A Twitter user shared a video of a tornado as it ripped through Iowa on Saturday night.

    The clip shows the towns of Patterson and Winterset.

    At least seven people have been reported dead.

  • Seventh victim

    A seventh person was killed in Lucas County by another tornado.

    The victim has not been publicly identified, but authorities said the person was inside an RV at Red Haw State Park in Chariton.

  • Intense winds

    Madison County, particularly Winterset, was one of the hardest hit areas.

    Meteorologists estimated an EF3 tornado moved through the area with winds of at least 136 miles per hour.

  • Disaster proclamation

    Iowa Governor Kim Reynolds issued a Madison County Disaster Proclamation to provide resources to the state to help with the response and recovery.

    The governor’s office also said additional counties may be added to the proclamation in the future.

  • Severe weather possible

    Parts of Arkansas, Oklahoma, Missouri, Texas and Tennessee may experience severe thunderstorms Sunday evening.

    According to Accuweather, the predicted storms bring tornado threats, flooding and high winds.

  • Most damage in rural areas

    Saturday night’s tornado missed the town of Winterset, with most damage occurring in rural areas.

    The Winterset Community School District released a statement on its Facebook page.

    “Our hearts go out to everyone affected by today’s weather. We want to let everyone know that New Bridge Church opens tonight as a Red Cross shelter and will offer a pancake breakfast starting at 7 a.m. for those affected and emergency medical service workers.”

  • Six victims identified

    Seven people are believed to have died from the tornado, and authorities have just revealed the identities of six of the victims:

    • Cecilia Lloyd, 72 years old
    • Rodney Clark, 64
    • Melissa Bazley, 63 years old
    • Michel Bolger, 37 years old
    • Kenley Bolger, 5 years old
    • Owen Bolger, 2 years old
  • The damage is “devastating”

    A Twitter user has shared a photo of the damage caused by last night’s tornado, as volunteers help with recovery efforts.

  • Creation of a Red Cross shelter

    A Red Cross shelter has been set up at New Bridge Church in Madison County.

    If you need help, you can contact the Madison County Chamber of Commerce by calling 515-462-1185.